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Thread: Birds Business Guide

  1. #21
    Verified Member midnight_rambler's Avatar
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    Re: Birds Business Guide

    Quote Originally Posted by sonaray View Post
    I am sure with discussion and help of experienced persons we will be able to reach to a conclusion when a strong guide will be available to make a person capable of earning 50,000 a month, and if we achieved this level i think it will be a great help to many InshaAllah.
    @sonaray bro. this link will be usefull, as it has discussed briefly in the past...http://birdsplanet.com/forum/showthr...729#post126729

    regards,
    Shah...
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  2. #22
    Premium Member ka_khan's Avatar
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    Re: Birds Business Guide

    Depends upon the breed,no of chicks they give per clutch.Their breeding cycle,price of the youngs.Budgies breed in cycles throughout the year,are tough and easy for the beginners but have low rate.
    Lovebirds in the next choice have good return but have breeding problem.
    Java's are also good in breeding and will fetch a good price.
    Doves are good cyclic breeders but again low price.
    Fancy chicken is another good choice will lay hundreds of eggs,you will need an incubator.Young chicks will get you price and as they are raised the price is increased.With them the problem is that they need lot of space.If you are living in apartments or dont have space then its not a good option.
    These are some of the simple species which one can handle.
    In second round comes the more expensive birds like rosella,rumps,Raw's,greys etc but they should be the second choice after gaining some experience as they are costly.
    No one has calculated the 'COST OF PRODUCTION',how much is the cost of feed,labor,medicines etc per pair per clutch.For example a pair has costed Rs 200 per clutch and you got 4 chicks then a chick costed you Rs 50.
    (These are my rough throughts not calculated so dont take it actual and work on it accordingly).
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    Verified Member Chaudhry Sahib's Avatar
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    Re: Birds Business Guide

    It also matters that how much profit u get with same amount of work/labour input i.e. daily care, feed and birds' space allocation. Common breed of any specie wont give u good profit in this term. Crested, Inos, Fallows, DF spangle, Dark eyed clear etc. may bring better profit (on the other hand u cant buy them at rate of Rs. 500)
    Ghulam-e-Muhammad
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  4. #24
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    Re: Birds Business Guide

    dear bro, kia aap mein se koi bhai apne hospital cage ki snap share ker sakte hein, thanks in advance.
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    Re: Birds Business Guide

    I've got no hospital cage, but ideally it should be a wooden cage, covered from three sides and bars or wire mash at the front only. There sould be the provision of a light bulb (the Edisson one, not the energy saver) at one side so that if the bird feels that it's too hot, it can go to the other side. Since its purpose is to secure a sick or injured bird who doesn't need to fly around, it should be of an appropriate size instead of a large general ward. The base should be white or paper should be placed on it to monitor the poop of the bird which is also an indication as to how the bird is progressing.
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    Re: Birds Business Guide

    WARNING: FOLLOWING ARE ONLY MY VIEWS ON THE SUBJECT WHICH ARE NOT BACKED UP BY VERIFIABLE DATA AND/OR PERSONAL EXPERIENCE OF DOING BIRDS' BUSINESS. IF, HOWEVER, SOMEBODY STARTS EARNING A GOOD LIVELIHOOD IN LIGHT OF THE POINTS MENTIONED, I RESERVE THE RIGHT TO CLAIM 20% ROYALTY.

    Keep it Straight and Simple.

    1. What do you know about bird keeping?
    a. Self scrutiny—are you capable of handling them?
    b. Do you have the required skills and knowledge to keep them healthy?
    c. Can you tell apart a male from a female? A young from an adult?

    2. What do you know about business?
    a. Do you know some basics like supply and demand? cost, price, and profit?
    b. Is there a sizeable market in the city for your birds?
    c. Is there a thing called re-investment or retained earnings?

    3. Do you have the resources?
    a. Physical and mental, spatial and monetary?
    b. Do you have a back-up in case of an emergency?

    Now let’s move forward from here:

    4. Which birds are “in demand” round the year?
    a. Budgies, love birds, cockatiels, finches, java, doves, etc. but which varieties?

    5. Which birds are prolific breeders?
    a. Almost all of the above, but which specie will give you the best yield? A pair of budgies may give you 6 pairs of chicks a year compared to doves which may give you 4.

    6. Which birds are hardy—who can negotiate change easily—weather, feed, upkeep, etc.

    7. Setting up milestones and benchmarks to get yourself motivated and energetic.

    To begin with, consider you are in the business for a long time and not just for a season or two. Make quality investment in cages and birds because these are the foundation stones upon which the whole edifice will be built. Instead of cheap, cramped, packed compartments, you should consider multipurpose, adjustable cages of the size 2x2x3 (HxWxL). Why, because cages are not disposed of or changed frequently, and if you’ve got 1.5x1.5x1.5 size, considering budgies as a start, there will be limitations to maneuver with bigger birds, the removable partition would allow cockatiels and lovebirds too. Even though they may breed in 1.5 feet long cages but Lovebirds best breed in longer cages than shorter ones. Similarly if you’ve got bigger cages without the partition you may be wasting the space with small varieties of birds.

    You may get the full set up of 200 cages installed as suggested by @watchman and incur a cost that is termed as sunk cost. Now move tactfully and fill only about 30% of them with young birds of a single specie, and let them settle to become adult and come into breeding shape. If these are budgies, then I think they will take about 2-3 months to do the same and if you handle things correctly, then the remaining 70% of your cages will be filled by the 8th month of starting your business.

    In all fairness, if you had initially bought 200 pairs, you could have easily started getting returns after the 4th month so is this a good ploy to wait for 4 extra months? First off, as a starter, the risk factor is the highest during the infancy of your business so it’s better safe than sorry. Secondly, when you’re ‘in’ the business you may learn that the marketability of some other specie has more potential, so now you have the option to go for it rather than rue your chances of doing it. Thirdly, it is being observed that not ALL the birds that you brought in from another place breed readily compared to home grown ones, whose ratio is much higher.

    Another reason is that you would be able to sell off the original 30% pairs in the beginning of the next year without compromising the production level to slow down because 100% of your pairs would be in full swing as those 30% would already be replaced by adult, home grown pairs. You may adopt the same cycle next year and keep replacing 30% of your production line, retaining only the best, and not be worried about how to give them a rest (The culled birds will automatically get a rest while acclimatizing at the new place). From here on, you may consider getting other varieties or species of birds and slowly and gradually introducing newer ones into the aviary without letting the production go down or stick to the ones that have helped you becoming a successful businessman.

    We have seen too many people earning good amount from birds’ business, but we don’t know how much they have lost over the years. We are admiring them today but they have got loads of experience—both negative and positive—to reach at this point.
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  7. #27
    Verified Member sy3m's Avatar
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    Re: Birds Business Guide

    Quote Originally Posted by feika View Post
    IF HOWEVER, SOMEBODY STARTS EARNING A GOOD LIVELIHOOD IN LIGHT OF THE POINTS MENTIONED, "I RESERVE THE RIGHT TO CLAIM 20% ROYALTY".
    lol

    nice points...
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  8. #28
    Premium Member usaid ahmed's Avatar
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    Re: Birds Business Guide

    Quote Originally Posted by feika View Post
    I've got no hospital cage, but ideally it should be a wooden cage, covered from three sides and bars or wire mash at the front only. There sould be the provision of a light bulb (the Edisson one, not the energy saver) at one side so that if the bird feels that it's too hot, it can go to the other side. Since its purpose is to secure a sick or injured bird who doesn't need to fly around, it should be of an appropriate size instead of a large general ward. The base should be white or paper should be placed on it to monitor the poop of the bird which is also an indication as to how the bird is progressing.
    Wooden cages are an open invitation for mites, they are also harder to disinfect/clean.

    There are miniature iron cages available in empress market and gharibabad cage market for 100-200 rs which have removable trays under wire flooring. One can easily place tissue paper on the base of the tray to monitor the droppings of the sick bird. Further a bulb can be positioned on one side of the cage to provide heat, the bird can move away to the other side if it is not okay with the temperature.
    After recovery, the whole cage can be scrubbed clean with germikill along with its internal accessories like tray,pots and perch.

    regards
    You were born with wings
    Why prefer to crawl through life?

    -Rumi
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  9. #29
    Premium Member sonaray's Avatar
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    Re: Birds Business Guide

    good post feika sb, good and thought provoking
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  10. #30
    Premium Member ka_khan's Avatar
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    Re: Birds Business Guide

    Good guidelines @feika........as always.
    Lot of focus is given on budgies.Do we have a breeder/business man who is earning from them?
    Do you know someone who owns from them and how much profit will 200 pairs give/month?
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